Q:

Why do plants have thorns?

A:

Quick Answer

Thorns are essentially defense mechanisms for the plant, much like teeth are for an animal. The sharp points protect the plant against animals that want to eat it.

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Why do plants have thorns?
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Full Answer

Honey locust trees are a prime example of plants with thorns, according to The American Phytopathological Society. Thorns are actually a type of branch, and roses do not have true thorns. Instead, roses have prickles, which are a part of the skin of the plant. Cacti, on the other hand, have spines, which are a modified leaf. Overall, all of these types of growths on plants do the same thing; defend the plant against predators.

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