Q:

What is a polar solvent?

A:

Quick Answer

A polar solvent is composed of molecules, such as H2O, that have a discernible asymmetry in their surface electromagnetic charge. Water molecules consist of one oxygen atom single-bonded to two hydrogen atoms that are grouped together on one side of the molecule. This concentrates a negative charge at one pole.

Know More

Full Answer

Polar solvents dissolve similarly polar solutes. A good example of this is salt dissolving in water. Table salt is NaCl, or ionic sodium chloride. The extra electron adds a strong negative charge to the salt molecule and makes it strongly polar. Water readily dissolves polar solutes, while nonpolar solutes, such as oil, do not.

Learn more about Solutions & Mixtures

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the chemical formula for white glue?

    A:

    White glue is made from water, H2O, and polyvinyl acetate, a polymer of vinyl acetate which has the chemical formula C4H6O2. Polymers are made by chemically linking molecules together in chains of varying lengths, so the formula for polyvinyl acetate is technically (C4H6O2)n, where n can stand for any number.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some examples of pure compounds?

    A:

    Water (H2O), salt (NaCl), methane (H4N) and sugar (C12H22O11) are all examples of pure compounds. However, in many ways, the designation "pure" compound is an oxymoron, since all compounds are pure.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are examples of unsaturated solutions?

    A:

    Unsaturated solutions are solutions that contain less solute than the actual amount of solute that the solvent can dissolve. If more solutes can be dissolved in the solution, the solution is still considered unsaturated. Every solute and solvent combination has its limit, and once this limit is reached, the substance is in a state that is called the saturation point.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a non-aqueous solvent?

    A:

    A solvent is a substance that dissolves a solute in the formation of a solution, and any solvent other than water is considered a non-aqueous solvent. Some common examples include ether, alcohol, benzene, disulphide, carbon tetrachloride and acetone. While water is a useful solvent for investigating acid-base properties, the differences between water and other solvents mean that non-aqueous solvents often provide more realistic experimental outcomes.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore