Q:

What is a pure element?

A:

In nuclear science, a pure element is a chemical element that consists of a singular stable isotope – that is, atoms of the same element. Examples of a pure element are gold, aluminium and fluoride.

In chemistry, a pure element is a substance in which all the atoms have the same number of protons or the same atomic number. Chemically pure elements can bond in multiple ways and can be found in a number of structures. For example, carbon can be found as a diamond through the process of pressure and bonding of the carbon elements. Graphite is another example of the layering of carbon isotopes.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Why is carbon dioxide nonpolar?

    A:

    Carbon dioxide is nonpolar because its bonds are symmetrical, according to Elmhurst College's Virtual Chembook. The bonds between the carbon and two oxygen atoms are polar; however, the entire molecule is nonpolar because the partial charges cancel each other.

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  • Q:

    What is inside an atom?

    A:

    There are three primary components inside an atom: neutrons, electrons and protons. The neutrons have no charge, while the protons have a positive charge and electrons have a negative charge. The neutrons and protons exist in a dense center area called the nuclei, while the electrons exist in another space, called orbitals, around the nuclei.

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    What is the Lewis structure for ozone?

    A:

    The Lewis dot structure for ozone is an O with four dots connected to an O with two dots and a plus sign by two lines. The equation ends with an O featuring six dots attached by a singular line to the other oxygen symbols.

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    Is CH4 polar or nonpolar?

    A:

    CH4, or methane, is a nonpolar molecule. Methane is a highly symmetric molecule made up of atoms with similar electonegativities, and consequentially, it has an evenly distributed electron cloud and no regions of significant charge.

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