Q:

What does a rectifier do?

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Quick Answer

A rectifier is responsible for converting alternating current to direct current. The rectifier works by using one or more diodes for the conversion. It is considered an electrical device that can be found in many different types of electronics as a power source, notes Techopedia.

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Full Answer

Rectifiers can be found in electronics such as household appliances, laptops, TV sets and video game consoles. They can also be found in power supplies and radio signals. A rectifier can also detect the presence of flame. There are different waveforms found in rectifiers, including half wave or full wave; single-phase AC; or three-phase AC.

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