Q:

Why is reproduction necessary for living things?

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Quick Answer

Reproduction is necessary for living things because it enables them to create offspring and continue their population. Through reproduction, they pass on their genetic information to the next generation. This ensures that their species continues to exist on Earth.

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Full Answer

By reproducing, new living things are created. There are two methods for reproduction. Sexual reproduction involves two members of a species, typically a male and female, whereas asexual reproduction enables a living thing to reproduce without the need for another organism. Most living things reproduce either sexually or asexually, although there are a few rare species that are capable of reproducing through both methods.

In sexual reproduction, two parents reproduce and contribute a gamete, which is a reproductive cell that contains a haploid, which is a single set of chromosomes. The offspring is produced from a combination of genes inherited from both parents. Half of the genetic material of the offspring comes from each gamete. Humans and most other animals reproduce this way.

In asexual reproduction, a single parent cell produces genetically identical offspring. Living things that reproduce asexually do not need to receive cells from another living thing. A single parent provides all chromosomes, which is why the offspring is identical in genetic structure. Bacteria, yeast and molds are some species that reproduce asexually.

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