Q:

What is a saltwater biome?

A:

The saltwater biome refers to the world's saltwater bodies. The saltwater biome is found all over the world, in the form of oceans, seas, bays and gulfs. More commonly called the marine biome, the saltwater biome differs in a number of important ways from freshwater biomes. Marine biomes are home to innumerable species of fish, plants, mammals, algae, bacteria and invertebrates.

The living components of the saltwater biome are called the biome’s biotic factors, while the non-living factors are called abiotic components. Abiotic factors of the ocean include the climate, the mineral content of the water and the ocean currents. Additionally, the shape of the ocean floor and the rocks and cliffs arising from it are abiotic factors.

The biotic factors of the ocean are abundant. While fish are one of the most important groups of animals living in the saltwater biome, there are many other types of animals that live in the habitat as well. The saltwater biome is home to blue whales, the largest animals on the earth, as well as the plankton that feed these whales. The saltwater biome is also home to dolphins, otters, seals and many other marine mammals. Fish take numerous forms in the marine biome, including the gargantuan ocean sunfish that weigh more than 1,000 pounds as well as tiny minnows that weigh only a few ounces.

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