Q:

What scientists study earthquakes?

A:

Seismologists are the scientists that study earthquakes and the related activities to earthquakes. The composition and structure of the earth is also a part of what seismologists research.

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Seismologists use instruments to gather data and monitor the activity of the Earth's crust. This profession also monitors the activities that result from an earthquake. This includes tsunamis, volcanoes, oceanic activity and atmospheric processes.

To become a seismologist, a bachelor degree is required. The degree is usually in a geophysics-related field. To further a career in this industry, a graduate degree may be required. Seismologists perform the majority of their work in laboratories and offices but also explore sites of seismic activity.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What causes earthquakes?

    A:

    The surface of the earth is called the crust, and it is made up of plates, called tectonic plates, that move. Earthquakes happen when these plates bump, scrape or drag against each other.

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  • Q:

    What state has the most earthquakes?

    A:

    The U.S. Geological Survey reports that, as of 2014, Alaska accounts for about half of all earthquakes registered in the United States. The USGS also indicates that many smaller magnitude earthquakes go unreported in the state. California has the second-most reported earthquakes among U.S. states.

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  • Q:

    Can we predict earthquakes?

    A:

    Scientists can make predictions about earthquake probability, but there is no reliable way to foresee any given earthquake. Some people have claimed that they can predict earthquakes, but their claims do not withstand scientific scrutiny.

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  • Q:

    How do earthquakes form?

    A:

    Earthquakes are formed by a sudden, violent underground movement of the Earth's crust. These natural phenomena typically occur along a fault line or fault plane, which is a geological region of compressed rocks dividing crustal plates.

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