Q:

What is serous fluid?

A:

According to About.com, serous fluid is a normal, thin watery discharge that comes from a wound during its very early stages of healing. Typically, serous fluid appears between the first 48 to 72 hours after receiving a wound.

About.com points out that serous fluid is usually present in very small amounts. If there are large amounts of clear fluid forming around the incision line after a surgery, the development needs to be brought to the attention of a doctor. Although the fluid is normally clear, it is also sometimes yellowish in color. In some cases, serous fluid is able to escape the body through the skin even if there is no incision point or wound. This is common when an individual receives massive amounts of fluid.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    How is lymph fluid formed?

    A:

    Lymph is formed when interstitial fluid comes into contact with blood. Initially, it is a watery liquid with the same consistency as interstitial fluid, according to the Journal of Lipid Research. However, lymph thickens as it accumulates additional material from blood, such as proteins and lymphocytes.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Can you make more synovial fluid?

    A:

    The synovial membrane of a synovial joint produces and maintains proper levels of synovial fluid. As explained by Johns Hopkins, the synovial membrane is tissue that lines the joint and seals it into a joint capsule. Synovial fluid is a clear, viscous liquid that fills the joint capsule for lubrication.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the function of tissue fluid?

    A:

    Tissue fluid acts as a fuelling station in terms of cell nutrients, and it is the main component of the extracellular fluid, which also includes transcellular fluid and plasma. Tissue fluid contains glucose, fatty acids, salt and minerals such as calcium, potassium and magnesium. The nutrients of the tissue fluid come from blood capillaries. Tissue fluid can also hold waste products resulting from metabolic processes.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How does fluid and electrolyte balance differ between young adults and the elderly?

    A:

    A 2011 study of differences in electrolyte and fluid balance in Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease between young adults and the elderly found that the most notable difference is the decreased ability of the elderly to regulate kidney function. The study suggests that individuals experience difficulties in excreting a concentrated or a diluted urine, inclusive of regulated amounts of waste ammonium, sodium or potassium.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore