Q:

Should people protect endangered species?

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Quick Answer

People should strive to protect endangered species. Since all species are interconnected, the extinction of one could have far reaching and detrimental effects on others, notes Curiosity.com from Discovery.

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Should people protect endangered species?
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Full Answer

Humans are responsible for the loss of many species of wildlife, insects and birds. In Yellowstone National Park, a decline in the population of gray wolves affected the elk population, and its numbers increased. This caused widespread destruction of trees around the water bodies. Migrating birds did not have any place to nest, and the water was too hot for the trout. Gray wolves had to be reintroduced into the park to control the elk population and reduce the impact on the trees.

The honey bee is another species that is affected by human activity. Honey bee numbers are dwindling due to excessive use of pesticides. Bees are responsible for pollinating fruits, vegetables and nuts. If humans do not step up and protect the honey bee population, then 90 different food plants will disappear and greatly affect what humans consume. Gene banks collect and store DNA from species that are endangered. This makes it possible for scientists to clone a particular species if it faces extinction in the future. In this delicate ecosystem, humans have objectively coherent, observable reasons to do their bit to save species that are on the verge of extinction.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Why should we protect the environment?

    A:

    It is important to protect the environment because man-made disruptions to ecosystems can cause extinction, because pollution creates dangers for both animals and people, and because mankind owes the natural world a moral obligation. Many of the dangers to the environment come from practices designed to make human life easier but actually threaten the long-term health and prosperity of humans.

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  • Q:

    How do homologous structures support evolution?

    A:

    Homologous structures, such as the fins of whales and the hands of monkeys, demonstrate that while a species may use structures for different purposes, the species shared a common ancestor. By definition, homologous structures refer to those that were derived from ancestrally similar structures. The natural world is full of examples of homologous structures, which the theory of natural selection predicts should be the case.

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  • Q:

    What are pros and cons of the Endangered Species Act?

    A:

    The Endangered Species Act helps to revive dwindling populations of critically endangered species and promotes environmental preservation, but it may be time consuming and costly to implement. The Endangered Species Act is a legal tool used to identify and protect endangered species at the federal level in the United States. It helps to raise awareness of imperiled plant and animal species, but it can also put vulnerable species in jeopardy and takes quite a bit of time and finances to implement.

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  • Q:

    How can people stop ozone depletion?

    A:

    According to the Environmental Protection Agency, ozone depletion is mostly due to the corrosive actions of certain chemical compounds, such as refrigerants. Halting ozone depletion hinges on banning the use of these substances or preventing their release into the atmosphere. Because many of these compounds are extremely long-lived, molecules that escape into the atmosphere can cause ozone damage for decades.

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