Q:

Where is silt found?

A:

Quick Answer

Silt is found in floodplains, which are areas by streams or rivers that have experienced repeated flooding. It is the component of soil that makes up mud.

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Full Answer

Silt is one of many particles that exist in the soil, and other particles include gravel, sand and clay. Silt is smaller than gravel and sand in size but larger than clay, with sizes ranging from 0.05 to 0.002 millimeters. Silt is a fine material that is similar to sand but grittier.

Soil with silt is used for farming, but it can erode easily. During dust storms, it's blown away. During floods, it's carried downstream.

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