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What was the strongest tornado on record?

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Quick Answer

As of 2013, the strongest recorded tornado in terms of wind speed hit Moore, Okla., on May 3, 1999. The largest tornado and second-strongest by wind speed hit El Reno, Okla., on May 31, 2013.

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What was the strongest tornado on record?
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Full Answer

A June 2013 USA Today article states that an EF5 tornado that hit near Oklahoma City on May 31, 2013 had winds of up to 295 miles per hour. This tornado, which hit El Reno, Okla., was the largest and widest tornado ever recorded with a width of 2.6 miles and the second strongest by wind speed. According to Dr. Jeff Masters at Weather Underground, the only tornado that had higher wind speed was a tornado that hit Moore, Okla., with wind speeds of up to 302 miles per hour. This tornado struck on May 3, 1999.

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