Q:

What is the temperature of a burning match?

A:

The temperature of a burning match is 600 to 800 degrees Celsius. The temperature of a burning candle is 600 to 1,400 degrees Celsius, and that of a Bunsen burner is 1,570 degrees Celsius.

Fluorescent light has a temperature of 60 to 80 degrees Celsius, while lightning has a temperature of 30,000 degrees Celsius. It is possible to estimate temperature of a flame by its color. A dull red flame has a temperature of 500 to 600 degrees Celsius, whereas a bright red flame has a temperature of 800 to 1,000 degrees Celsius. A bright yellow flame has a temperature of 1,200 to 1,400 degrees Celsius.


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