Q:

Is tin magnetic or non-magnetic?

A:

Tin is magnetic in the literal sense of the word. The effect is so weak that it could be considered non-magnetic for all practical purposes. It is called a paramagnetic substance scientifically, but it has such a weak effect that it can be compared to a diamagnetic element.

What is commonly called a tin can or just a tin is actually made of steel that has been coated on either side with a very thin layer of tin. Steel makes up the bulk of the can's mass, and it is the steel that is attracted to a magnet rather than the tin itself.


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