Q:

What is the toughest metal on earth?

A:

Quick Answer

The toughest or hardest metal on earth is maraging steel, which is a mixture of metals including titanium, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum. The metal is manufactured through a process that involves high temperature heating in order to mix the various components.

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Full Answer

Maraging steel is known to be tolerant to heat and can therefore remain sturdy even after being subjected to high temperatures for a long time. This quality makes it ideal for designing equipment that is used continuously under high temperatures. Engines, crankshafts, gears and automatic firing weapons are some of the things that can be made using this type of metal.

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