Q:

What makes up the Pacific Ranges?

A:

The Pacific Ranges consist of parts of the Rocky Mountains, the Olympic Range, the Cascade Range and the Coast Range. The highest peak in the Pacific Ranges is Mount Rainier located in the Pacific Northwest at 14,410 feet tall.

There are several active volcanoes nestled in the Pacific Ranges, including Mount Shasta in California, Mount Rainier and Mount Saint Helens in Washington, Mount Hood in Oregon and Mount Garibaldi in British Columbia. The Pacific Ranges stretch from Canada down through a large part of California. The Columbia River, the second largest flow of water in the United States behind the Mississippi River, flows from Idaho to the Pacific through the Pacific Ranges.


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