Q:

What is an uplifted block bounded by two reverse faults?

A:

An uplifted block of planetary crust that is bound by two faults, whether they are reverse faults or normal faults, is called a horst. Horst is a German word that means thicket or heap. The uplifted block may also be considered a hanging wall relative to the faults.

Reverse faults are made up of hanging walls and foot walls. Foot walls are wedge-shaped and sink below the land. Hanging walls are shaped like an upside-down wedge and are pushed up by the foot wall beside them. These faults are called reverse faults because they appear to reverse gravity, forcing land up rather than making it fall down.

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