Q:

Why is Venus so bright?

A:

Venus is one of the brightest objects in the night sky because the thick clouds that surround the surface reflect most of the light that reaches it. Another reason Venus appears so bright is due to the fact that it is the closest planet to the Earth.

The planet Venus can usually be seen within a few hours after the sun goes down or just before sunrise as the brightest object in the sky aside from the moon. Venus seems to be brightening, which makes it even more visible from the Earth. Around the 17th century, Galileo discovered that Venus also has phases that are similar to that of the moon.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What does Venus look like?

    A:

    Venus, the second planet from the sun, is slightly smaller than the Earth and is covered by thick clouds of sulphuric acid that make it difficult to observe its surface. Venus appears as a bright object in the morning sky.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the lowest temperature on Venus?

    A:

    The lowest temperature on Venus is minus 175 degrees Celsius, found at an atmospheric layer 125 kilometers above the surface of the planet. The planet's average temperature, however, stands at 464 degrees Celsius, making it hotter than Mercury despite being farther away from the sun.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How big is Venus?

    A:

    Venus is just slightly smaller than the Earth, with a radius of about 3,760 miles and a circumference a little over 23,627 miles. These measurements make Venus about 94 percent of the size of the Earth, although it is only about 82 percent as voluminous.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the bright planet next to the moon?

    A:

    Depending on the time of year and phase of the moon, Venus, Mercury, Mars, Jupiter or Saturn may appear as a bright planet next to the moon in the night sky. For example, in April 2014, Saturn appeared just to the lower-left of a gibbous moon.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore