Q:

What is Venus's gravitational pull?

A:

According to NASA, the surface gravitational pull on Venus is 9.5 meters per second squared, or 31 feet per second squared. The gravitational constant, G, is based on Earth's gravity and is equal to 1 on Earth, but because Venus has less gravity, G is equal to .88 on Venus.

According to Cal Tech University, since Venus and Earth are almost the same size and mass, their surface gravitational pulls are almost the same. The surface gravity on Venus is about 91 percent of the surface gravity on Earth. Therefore, if you weigh 100 pounds on Earth, you would only weigh 91 pounds on Venus.

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