Q:

What is the viscosity of water?

A:

The viscosity of water is 1.0020 millipascal seconds at 20°C. The viscosity of water, and other substances, can change with a difference in temperature. Water has low viscosity compared to other fluids.

When a substance is viscous, it is said to be "thick," meaning it is difficult to move through the fluid. An example of a substance with high viscosity is honey. Others are so viscous that they almost seem solid, like butter or margarine. These mentioned substances flow easier at higher temperatures; that means they become less viscous. Most common fluids have a constant viscosity regardless of force applied. These fluids are called Newtonian fluids.

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    A:

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