Q:

What is the weight of Pluto?

A:

Pluto does not have a weight, because weight is a force exerted by one gravitational body on another gravitational body. The dwarf planet Pluto has a mass of 1.31 x 10^22 kilograms, and it's weight would depend on the acceleration at the surface of another planet.

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Full Answer

Pluto is less massive than the Earth by a factor of 456. It is so small, in fact, that astronomers reclassified it as a dwarf planet in 2008, because it does not exert enough gravitational force to evacuate small objects from it's orbit. A 100 pound human would weight just 6 pounds on Pluto.

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    Does Pluto have craters?

    A:

    Pluto, a dwarf planet, is subject to impact from cosmic material, which is the cause of planetary "craters." Pluto, however, is not close enough to Earth for modern imaging techniques to specifically identify these craters. They are assumed to exist.

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    Does Pluto have any rings?

    A:

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    What is Pluto's atmosphere made up of?

    A:

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    What is Pluto named after?

    A:

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