Q:

How is wind speed measured?

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Quick Answer

Wind speed is measured using a meteorological device known as an anemometer. This device measures wind velocity and is an important tool for meteorologists who need to study weather patterns.

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Full Answer

Although anemometers are available in several forms, the most common type is the cup anemometer. The cup anemometer has a vertical pole with three or four horizontal arms connected to the top. The horizontal arms have metal cups connected to the ends. When the wind blows, the cups begin to rotate the arms around the vertical pole. The rotating action of the cups turns the vertical pole, which is attached to a device that calculates wind speed.

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