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What is the world's largest peninsula?

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The world's largest peninsula is the Arabian Peninsula. The Arabian Peninsula is located in Southwest Asia and contains the countries of Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman, Yemen and Saudi Arabia.

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What is the world's largest peninsula?
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The Arabian Peninsula has also been referred to as the Arabian subcontinent because the expansive area is situated on its own tectonic plate, the Arabian Plate. The Arabian Peninsula has a diverse geographic makeup. It has a central plateau called the Nejd as well as various deserts, mountain ranges and marshy coastal areas. The highest elevation of the Arabian Peninsula, over 12,000 feet, is in Yemen. The Arabian Peninsula does not have an abundance of lakes, rivers or other water sources, so much of the land is unsuitable for agriculture.

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