Q:

What is the world's largest peninsula?

A:

Quick Answer

The world's largest peninsula is the Arabian Peninsula. The Arabian Peninsula is located in Southwest Asia and contains the countries of Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman, Yemen and Saudi Arabia.

Know More
What is the world's largest peninsula?
Credit: Juanmonino E+ Getty Images

Full Answer

The Arabian Peninsula has also been referred to as the Arabian subcontinent because the expansive area is situated on its own tectonic plate, the Arabian Plate. The Arabian Peninsula has a diverse geographic makeup. It has a central plateau called the Nejd as well as various deserts, mountain ranges and marshy coastal areas. The highest elevation of the Arabian Peninsula, over 12,000 feet, is in Yemen. The Arabian Peninsula does not have an abundance of lakes, rivers or other water sources, so much of the land is unsuitable for agriculture.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How deep is the Laurentian Abyss?

    A:

    The Laurentian Abyss is estimated to be 19,685 feet deep, which is approximately 3.7 miles. It is an underwater depression located off the eastern coast of Canada in the Atlantic Ocean. Researchers consider it less of a trench and more of an underwater valley.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How are sand spits formed?

    A:

    Sand spits form after sudden changes in the shape of a coastline. This causes longshore drifts that deposit sediment in the direction of the drift, rather than along the coastline. Sand spits appear as fingers of land projecting from the coast.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What landforms start with the letter "E"?

    A:

    Some types of landforms that begin with the letter "E" are an escarpment, an estuary and an esker. Part of the topography of an area, a landform is a physical feature of the terrain and includes ocean features as well.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How are outwash plains formed?

    A:

    Outwash plains form when melt from glaciers deposit sand, sediments, gravel and clay along broad, sloping land. These landforms can be created quickly due to rapid water action and are often several layers thick due to irregular water flow from seasonal melting and refreezing.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore