Q:

What is the world's rarest marble?

A:

There is no single world's rarest marble, as the collectible market is constantly changing. However, a single gather confetti mica marble described as ultra rare sold for $10,999 in 2009.

Other rare marbles include sulfide marbles, which contain tiny porcelain figures and sell for $1000 each; glass German swirls from the 1930s, which sell for thousands of dollars in mint condition; and extremely rare pastoral china marbles, which sell for $10,000 or more. Other relatively rare marbles include German or American agate marbles, which sell for around $200 each; and glittery French Lutz marbles, which range from $100 for basic marbles to thousands for intricate designs.


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