Q:

What is zero gravity?

A:

Quick Answer

Zero gravity is a term often used to describe weightlessness, and it is often confused with microgravity. While escaping the gravitational pull of the Earth, sun and other celestial bodies can never be done completely, it is possible to create conditions of weightlessness that reduce the effects of localized gravity.

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Full Answer

All objects with mass create gravitational fields, and a small amount of gravity can be found everywhere in space. By orbiting the Earth or entering a state of free-fall, it is possible to experience periods of microgravity where objects appear to become weightless. Even when in space, objects are still held in orbit due to the effects of gravity.

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Related Questions

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    A:

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  • Q:

    What would happen if there was no gravity?

    A:

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    Who discovered gravity?

    A:

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  • Q:

    What causes gravity?

    A:

    As of 2014, science remains uncertain about what causes gravity, which is the attraction between two bodies. However, one theory is that small particles called gravitons are responsible for the force. Scientists continue to search for gravitons and gravitational waves to further the understanding of gravity's cause.

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