Q:

How long is basketball season?

A:

Quick Answer

Basketball season starts in late October and runs until mid- to late June. All college and professional teams complete their regular and post-season play within this time frame.

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Full Answer

Most college teams begin early season tournament and non-conference play in mid-November, and the regular season ends in early March. The Final Four marks the end of college basketball season, with the championship game held the first or second Monday in April. The NBA season runs longer, with teams beginning regular season play in late October and finishing in mid-April. The playoffs begin within a few days, and the finals typically start in early June.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a basketball made out of?

    A:

    NBA balls are made of a leather exterior housing a butyl rubber bladder, which holds the air and creates enough pressure to properly bounce the basketball, and a carcass made of nylon and polyester. There are not any official specifications as to what basketballs should be made of.

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  • Q:

    What is the diameter of a basketball?

    A:

    A standard NBA basketball is 9.43 to 9.51 inches in diameter, or 29 5/8 to 29 7/8 inches in circumference. It is inflated to a pressure of 7.5 to 8.5 pounds.

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  • Q:

    Where does basketball come from?

    A:

    Basketball originated in Springfield, Mass., on Jan. 20, 1892 and was developed by Dr. James Naismith. It began as a simple game involving a ball and a peach basket that could be played during the winter.

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  • Q:

    Where was basketball invented?

    A:

    Basketball was invented in Springfield, Mass., at a YMCA training school in December 1891 by Dr. James Naismith. Dr. Naismith, an instructor at the school, was looking for an athletic distraction for students while confined indoors during the cold New England winter.

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