Q:

What is the size of a tennis ball?

A:

Quick Answer

An official tennis ball is between 2.575 inches and 2.7 inches in diameter as defined by the International Tennis Federation. Tennis balls also must conform to other criteria if they are to be used in regulation play.

Know More
What is the size of a tennis ball?
Credit: Les and Dave Jacobs Cultura Getty Images

Full Answer

Tennis balls are covered in felt and have an internal pressure of 12 pounds per square inch. Tennis balls used in regulation play are optic yellow in color because the bright hue makes the balls highly visible both on the court and on television. The U.S. Open uses 70,000 tennis balls per year between practice and competitive game play. This equals 700 square yards of felt and more than 3,900 pounds of rubber.

Learn more in Tennis

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the size of a tennis court?

    A:

    A tennis court is 71 feet long and 36 feet wide. The inner lines used to mark the boundaries in a singles match are 27 feet wide.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What does deuce mean in tennis?

    A:

    The International Tennis Federation states that "deuce" is the score when both players have won three points each in a game. The next player to score a point will have "advantage." If the player having advantage wins the next point, then they are awarded the game.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What skills are needed to play tennis?

    A:

    Both physical and mental skills are needed to play tennis. The physical skills include athleticism, speed, balance and hand-eye coordination. The mental skills include decision making, motivation, concentration and competitiveness.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you build a tennis backboard?

    A:

    To build a tennis backboard, build a support frame out of wooden beams. Then, attach sheets of plywood. Install metal fence brackets to the back of the support frame, and hang it on a fence.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore