Q:

Why does the amplifier of a car stereo go into protect mode?

A:

Quick Answer

The amplifier in a car stereo may enter into protect mode for various reasons, including thermal overload or a loose wire connection. For some makes and models, the protection LED lights up when the system is powered on and will go off after a couple of minutes as part of its normal function.

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Full Answer

Depending on the manufacturer, the LED may blink in a certain sequence to indicate the nature of the problem, or there may be different colored lights for different types of malfunctions. Improper mounting of the car stereo to the metal of the vehicle rather than solely through the power and ground terminals may also cause problems.

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