Q:

What is the difference between ADSL and ADSL2?

A:

Since ADSL2 is an enhanced version of ADSL, or Asymmetrical Digital Subscriber Line, it has faster download rates and greater resistance to line noise. Line noise refers to the variation in a transmitted signal that typically occurs in electric connections.

Know More

Full Answer

ADSL2 also has an improved range compared to its ADSL counterpart that uses the same copper wires. An improved range automatically translates to a greater coverage and better transmission rates.  In order to save power, ADSL2 incorporates a stand-by-mode that also reduces the amount of time needed for initialization from 10 seconds in the traditional ADSL connection to about 3 seconds. Like other improved technologies, ADSL2  is reverse compatible with ADSL meaning ADLS2 equipment can be used at ADSL specs.  This greatly simplifies the process of upgrading from ADSL to ADSL2.

Both ADLS2 and ADSL are broadband connections that are capable of concurrently transporting numerous traffic types and signals. They achieve this by properly managing the available bandwidth from a two-wire pair used by telephone systems. This allows them to receive and transmit data of varying types at faster speeds than a single channel connection. Apart from ADSL2 and ADSL, there is ADSL+, which is also an upgrade to ADSL that provides greater speeds compared to both ADSL2 and ADSL.

Learn more in Internet & Networking

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the difference between Wi-Fi and wireless?

    A:

    Wi-Fi is a brand name for short-distance wireless communication networking technology, based on 802.11 standards that Wi-Fi Alliance adopted from IEEE, while wireless stands for computer network that is not connected by cables and utilizes cellular towers for data transmission.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the difference between ISDN and DSL?

    A:

    IIntegrated Services Digital Network, or ISDN, is a dial-up connection carried over specially installed lines, while digital subscriber line, or DSL, is an always-on connection that does not need to dial over the lines that it uses. ISDN and DSL work over the same kind of network, but the main difference is that the ISDN has to actually dial out to achieve a connection for data to flow through. DSL does not need to dial out, and as a result, the user can make calls while connected to the Internet.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the difference between DSL and ADSL?

    A:

    DSL, short for digital subscriber line, is a broad term for a digital high-speed data connection that uses the same wiring as a regular telephone line. Asymmetric DSL, or ADSL, is a specific type of DSL connection that divides the frequencies used to transmit data, which provides significantly improved download speeds at the cost of slower upload speeds.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the difference between ISDN and broadband?

    A:

    ISDN technology, or Integrated Services Digital Network, uses a single optical fiber to transmit a signal, while broadband uses a high-speed digital connection, typically with a digital signal. ISDN has multiple channels, while broadband offers a dedicated, constant connection.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore