Q:

How loud is 50 decibels?

A:

Fifty decibels is the level of noise of a quiet conversation at home or a quiet stream. In comparison, the general base of 70 decibels is the noise level of a vacuum cleaner or of radio and TV audio.

The sound of breathing is about 10 decibels. City traffic is 85 decibels. A motorcycle runs at 100 decibels. A rock concert is 115 decibels. A pneumatic riveter is 125 decibels. When standing within 80 feet, a jet at takeoff is 150 decibels, which is the threshold at which the eardrum can rupture. Anything over 80 decibels can cause permanent hearing damage with lengthy exposure.


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