Q:

How many megabytes are in a gigabyte?

A:

According to the University of Florida, there are 1,024 megabytes in a gigabyte. There is a common misconception that units of measurement used for data storage are based on a decimal system, when these terms are actually measured using a binary system.

This misunderstanding of data storage measurements causes confusion for individuals with limited exposure to technology. This has led many people to believe that 1,000 megabytes are equal to 1 gigabyte. The similarity between metric units of measure and the taxonomy used in this scenario is no accident. It is the result of short-hand terminology utilized by computer professionals.


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