Q:

What does "SMB" stand for?

A:

The acronym "SMB" stands for "server message block," which is a network file sharing protocol. Communication is mainly through server responses and client requests, and this SMB software exists within most versions of Microsoft Windows. UNIX and LAN Manager are file sharing systems utilizing SMB for non-Windows operating systems.

Server message block is also known as "session message block," which uses the same acronym. According to Acronym Finder, the acronym "SMB" also stands for "Super Mario Brothers," "Seven Mile Beach," "San Miguel Beer," "shared memory buffer," "Southwest Missouri Bank," "Steve Miller Band," "safety monitoring board," "systems management board," "surface mass balance," "school management board" and numerous other phrases.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What does "URL" stand for?

    A:

    URL is an acronym that stands for "uniform resource locator." Its purpose is to give an exact web address for files and sites on the Internet.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What does "CPR" stand for?

    A:

    "CPR" is an acronym for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which is a life-saving technique that is sometimes able to help restore a heartbeat or breathing in someone who is experiencing a life-threatening emergency. CPR involves restoring blood circulation, clearing the airway if necessary, and breathing for a person unable to breathe.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What does "http" stand for?

    A:

    The acronym “HTTP” stands for hypertext transfer protocol and appears at the front of every Internet address. HTTP is the method that browsers use to communicate with servers on the Internet, allowing computers to communicate with each other over different networks.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What does blog stand for?

    A:

    The word "blog" is a truncated form of the expression "web log." This expression refers to websites, especially personal websites, that publish discrete "entries" and display them in reverse chronological order.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore