Q:

How do electromagnetic brakes work?

A:

Electromagnetic brakes slow down or stop a moving machine by using an electromagnetic force to apply friction to its wheels. These brakes receive the electromagnetic force they require from a magnetic field comprised of a magnetic coil and a coil shell that is bolted to the machine frame.

Know More

Full Answer

A typical electromagnetic brake has three elements in its construction – a magnetic field comprising of a coil and a shell, an armature and the hub. When the brakes are applied, the armature is attracted to the magnetic field developed by the coil.

Simultaneously, a torque working in the opposite direction is transferred into the field to counteract the effect of the magnetic field. As the strength of the field falls, the vehicle begins to slow down and eventually stops. The disengagement process begins as soon as the vehicle stops. As the magnetic flux degrades rapidly, the armature is brought to its initial position ready to work again. This process is quite rapid and usually takes less than three seconds to complete. The smooth working of the coil is crucial to the effective functioning of the electromagnetic brake as it produces the magnetic field. The whole assembly has to be protected against extremes of temperature as well as wear and tear, as both these factors are detrimental to the functioning of the brakes.

Electromagnetic brakes are now used in airplane braking systems in addition to extensive use in train and tram braking systems.

Learn more in Brakes

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How do hydro-boost brakes work?

    A:

    Hydro-boost brakes work by applying hydraulic pressure from the power steering system to assist in braking. When the brakes are applied, hydraulic fluid flows from the power steering pump to increase braking effort, while fluid also flows from the hydro-boost system to the steering gear to assist in power steering.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do air-over-hydraulic brakes work?

    A:

    Air-over-hydraulic brake systems operate using a combination of compressed air and hydraulic pressure, and the release of the air and hydraulic pressure engages the master cylinder. It then applies pressure to the valves, and the brake fluid is released. The brakes then exert friction on the tires, which stops them.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long do brakes last?

    A:

    Brake pads last anywhere from 30,000 to 70,000 miles, and brake rotors can last about three times longer. The exact mileage depends on the type and composition of the pad's friction material, the owner's driving habits and driving conditions.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why do my brakes pulsate when stopping?

    A:

    An uneven rotor surface is the most common cause of pulsation that drivers feel in their brake pedal while braking. Tomorrow's Technician explains that the surface of brake rotors, sometimes called brake discs, should not vary any more than 0.001 inches around the entire rotor. This means that even the slightest variation in the surface of a rotor or disc is felt by drivers when braking.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore