Q:

What is the lowest deck on a ship called?

A:

The lowest deck on a ship is called the orlop deck (pronouned "or·lop"). It lies above the space at the bottom of the hull. The term is most often used for a ship that has four or more decks.

The word "orlop" was first used between 1375 and 1425. It derives from the late Middle English word "overloppe," meaning a covering, and the Middle Dutch word "overlopen," meaning run over.

The orlop typically lies below the water line and is the storage location for the ship's cables.

The term "orlop" is most commonly used to describe the bottom deck of a wooden sailing ship.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What are the decks of a ship called?

    A:

    There are different decks of a ship, but the primary deck of the vessel is called the main deck. The main deck may be in different locations, depending on the type of ship. It is not usually the topmost deck.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a large merchant ship called?

    A:

    A large merchant ship falls under a few different classifications, two of the largest being the "Capesize" and "Chinamax" ship sizes or types, which both allow up to 400,000 DWT vessel tonnage. A large merchant ship is also called a cargo vessel or merchant vessel.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the figurehead at the bow of a ship called?

    A:

    A carved figure mounted on a ship's bow is called a nautical figurehead. In the early days of seafaring, when wooden ships sailed the seas, carved figureheads depicting women were also known as "Neptune's wooden angels."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who invented the first clipper ship?

    A:

    The first true clipper was invented in 1812 by John W. Griffiths. A clipper is a sailing ship that is shaped aerodynamically so that it clips through water at great pace. It has a narrow build, a square rig and multiple large sails to help propel it through the water.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore