Q:

When a sailing vessel and a powered PWC meet head on in Virginia, which one stands?

A:

When a sailing vessel and a powered PWC meet head on, the sailing vessel is the stand-on vessel, according to the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Stand-on vessels maintain their course and the give-way vessels take the action to vary course.

Sailing vessels are always the stand-on vessel when coming bow to bow with a power driven vessel. If the give-way vessel is not taking appropriate actions to vary course, the stand-on vessel should take action but avoid turning to port.

The right side of a vessel is the starboard side. The left side of a vessel is the port side.

Sources:

  1. virginia.gov

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