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www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/apr/26/dont-defend-yourself-in-court-tips-legal-system

Apr 26, 2016 ... If you were charged with a crime, could you defend yourself in court without a barrister or a solicitor? More and more of us are doing just that, ...

www.wikihow.com/Defend-Yourself-in-Court

Jul 8, 2017 ... Three Parts:Navigating the Legal Process as a Pro Se DefendantDefending Yourself in Civil CourtRepresenting Yourself in Criminal ...

legalanswers.sl.nsw.gov.au/defend-yourself-facing-charge-court/self-representation

Consider representing yourself if: you don't feel too ... Any defendant can represent her or himself in court. At present ... Defend yourself: facing a charge in court.

www.cliapei.ca/sitefiles/File/publications/CRI2.pdf

will have to go to court to defend yourself against the charge. You can go to court ... There are things you must know if you decide to go to court without a lawyer.

www.civillawselfhelpcenter.org/self-help/getting-started/representing-yourself-in-court

There are risks to representing yourself! Learn how to evaluate whether representing yourself is a good idea. Also, get some tips on how to represent yourself ...

www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/tips-success-courtroom-29462.html

Second, read Represent Yourself in Court, by Paul Bergman and Sara ... prove every element of your case -- or, if you are defending yourself against a lawsuit, ...

litigation.findlaw.com/going-to-court/should-you-represent-yourself-in-court.html

If you choose to represent yourself in court, you should seriously consider hiring a ... for the plaintiff testifies, the defense is allowed to cross-examine the witness.

criminal.findlaw.com/criminal-law-basics/defending-yourself-against-a-criminal-charge.html

Defending Yourself Against a Criminal Charge ... An alibi defense is evidence that you were somewhere else, often with ... So how do courts define "insane"?

legalbeagle.com/7227521-defend-yourself-court-lawyer.html

The term for defending yourself in court without an attorney is "pro se." It's easiest to defend yourself in small claims court or in a civil trial versus a criminal trial.