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Femoral Hernia
A femoral hernia is a bulging located near the groin and thigh that occurs when a small part of intestine pushes through the wall of the femoral canal. The femoral canal houses the femoral artery, smaller veins, and nerves. It is located just below the inguinal ligament in the groin. A femoral hernia can also be called a femorocele. ... More »
Source: healthline.com

Inguinal hernia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inguinal_hernia

An inguinal hernia is a protrusion of abdominal-cavity contents through the inguinal canal. Symptoms are present in about 66% of affected people. This may  ...

Inguinal Hernia Symptoms, Causes, Repair/Surgery - WebMD

www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/tc/inguinal-hernia-topic-overview

If you do not have an inguinal hernia, see information on common types of hernias. These include incisional, epigastric, and umbilical hernias in children and ...

Inguinal Hernia: Causes, Symptoms & Diagnosis - Healthline

www.healthline.com/health/inguinal-hernia

Sep 26, 2015 ... An inguinal hernia occurs in the groin area when fatty or intestinal tissues push through the inguinal canal. It resides at the base of the ...

sportsmedicine.about.com/cs/hip_groin/a/hip2.htm
Pain in the groin is often the result of a groin (adductor muscle) pull or strain. The adductors are fan-like muscles in the upper thigh that pull the legs together when they contract. An over-the-counter anti-inflammatory can also be helpful to reduce pain and inflam... More »
By Elizabeth Quinn, About.com Guide

Inguinal hernia Symptoms - Mayo Clinic

www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/inguinal-hernia/basics/symptoms/con-20021456

Inguinal hernia — Comprehensive overview covers symptoms and repair of this abdominal hernia.

Inguinal Hernia | National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and ...

www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/digestive-diseases/inguinal-hernia/Pages/facts.aspx

Describes the types of inguinal hernia, as well as causes, symptoms, surgical treatment, and potential complications.

Inguinal hernia - Mayo Clinic

www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/inguinal-hernia/basics/definition/con-20021456

Mar 20, 2013 ... An inguinal hernia isn't necessarily dangerous by itself. It doesn't get better or go away on its own, however, and it can lead to life-threatening ...

Inguinal Hernia Repair Surgery Information from SAGES

www.sages.org/publications/patient-information/patient-information-for-laparoscopic-inguinal-hernia-repair-from-sages/

Approximately 600,000 inguinal or groin hernia repair operations are performed annually in the United States. Some are performed by the conventional “open” ...

SSAT - Physician Guidelines - Surgical Repair Of Groin Hernias

www.ssat.com/cgi-bin/hernia6.cgi

Repair of groin hernias is one of the most commonly performed outpatient surgical procedures and it is estimated that 750,000 inguinal hernia repairs are ...

Popular Q&A
Q: How are groin hernias treated?
A: Surgery is the only effective cure for a groin hernia. In adults, surgery is only necessary if the hernia is causing discomfort or there is risk of strangulatio... Read More »
Source: www.netdoctor.co.uk
Q: Who gets groin hernias?
A: Adults with an open pathway between the abdomen and groin may develop an indirect groin hernia. However, not all adults with an open pathway will develop this c... Read More »
Source: chealth.canoe.ca
Q: What are Groin Hernia Symptoms?
A: A. hernia., one of the most common reasons for surgery, occurs when part of an organ breaks through the tissue normally containing it, and intrudes on other par... Read More »
Source: www.wisegeek.com
Q: What is a Groin Hernia?
A: A. groin. hernia., also called an. inguinal hernia., is a medical problem that develops when a part of the intestine bulges through a portion of the. abdominal ... Read More »
Source: www.wisegeek.com
Q: Groin Hernia Signs & Symptoms.
A: Some people are not even aware they have a groin hernia, or inguinal hernia, until they visit their doctor for a routine exam. Many times, the hernia doesn't sh... Read More »
Source: www.ehow.com