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www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/what-are-hurricanes-k4.html

Hurricanes are large, swirling storms. They produce winds of 119 kilometers per hour (74 mph) or higher. That's faster than a cheetah, the fastest animal on land.

spaceplace.nasa.gov/hurricanes/en

Hurricanes are the most violent storms on Earth. People call these storms by other names, such as typhoons or cyclones, depending on where they occur.

www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/what-are-hurricanes-58.html

Hurricanes are large swirling storms with high-speed winds that form over warm ocean waters.

www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/hurricanes

Hurricanes are giant, spiraling tropical storms that can pack wind speeds of over 160 miles (257 kilometers) an hour and unleash more than 2.4 trillion gallons (9 ...

news.sky.com/story/how-hurricanes-are-named-and-how-they-are-categorised-11027448

1 day ago ... As Maria strengthens, we take a look at how hurricanes form and explore why some storms are more destructive than others.

video.nationalgeographic.com/video/101-videos/hurricanes-101

WATCH: Find out how hurricanes form and what's being done to better predict their impact.

www.livescience.com/60340-how-are-hurricanes-named.html

Sep 8, 2017 ... TAs Hurricane Irma blasts through the Caribbean, one may wonder how such an energetic force ended up with such a stodgy name.

metro.co.uk/2017/09/07/how-are-hurricanes-formed-6909521

Sep 7, 2017 ... With hurricane Irma and Harvey having a damaging impact on infrastructure and people's well-being, we examine how hurricanes are formed.

www.telegraph.co.uk/news/0/hurricane-names---how-are-they-decided

Sep 6, 2017 ... Hurricane Irma, the most powerful Atlantic Ocean hurricane in recorded history, has already made landfall in the island of Barbuda and is set to ...