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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cockpit

The word cockpit was originally a sailing term for the ... Cockpit first appeared in the English language in the 1580s, "a pit for fighting ...

www.word-detective.com/2009/08/cockpit

Aug 24, 2009 ... It was this “place where the important things are done” sense (and not, thank heavens, the “fighting chickens” meaning) that led “cockpit” to be ...

www.aerospaceweb.org/question/history/q0064.shtml

Feb 3, 2002 ... Origins of the Word Cockpit. Do you know why the pilot's area in a plane is called the cockpit? - question from Sandra. An intriguing question ...

www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-coc5.htm

Oct 22, 2005 ... ... Rick Loiacono, Florida: If I don't find out where the air-force term Cockpit came from, I'm ... Its origin is exotic and disquieting to modern minds.

english.stackexchange.com/questions/293950/what-is-the-etymology-of-the-term-cockpit

Dec 14, 2015 ... In the sailing world 'cockpit' is specified as a depression in the deck for the tiller and helmsman. Another meaning comes from the bloody sport ...

www.wordorigins.org/index.php/cockpit

Jun 8, 2006 ... Cockpit seems a rather strange choice to denote the pilot's compartment on an airplane, but once the semantic history of the word is known, ...

www.dictionary.com/browse/cockpit

Cockpit definition, a space, usually enclosed, in the forward fuselage of an airplane containing the flying controls, ... Word Origin and History for cockpit. Expand.

www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=cockpit

Look up cockpit at Dictionary.com: 1580s, "a pit for fighting cocks," from cock (n.1) + pit (n.1). Used in nautical sense (1706) for midshipmen's compartment below ...

www.quora.com/Why-is-a-cockpit-called-a-cockpit

The earliest airplanes copied the designs of the 1903 Wright Flyer, on which the pilot lay on the ... [1]. This was applied in aviation industry at first in 1914 during WWI to denote the pilot's section in an aircraft. Footnotes. [1] Ask Us - Origins of the Word Cockpit.