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Strigil - Wikipedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strigil

The strigil is a tool for the cleansing of the body by scraping off dirt, perspiration, and oil that were applied before bathing. In Ancient Greek and Roman cultures the strigil was primarily of use...

Greek Medicine: THE GRECO-ROMAN BATH

www.greekmedicine.net/hygiene/The_Greco-Roman_Bath.html

The ancient Greeks and Romans had the wisdom and insight to know that bodily cleanliness ... This was used for athletics and sporting activities. ... Then, they used a curved metal scraper called a strigil to scrape of this "muck", which would  ...

Why did ancient athletes cover themselves in oil? | Ancient and ...

ancientandmodernolympics.wordpress.com/2012/03/30/why-did-ancient-athletes-cover-themselves-in-oil/

Mar 30, 2012 ... Stephen Miller in his 2004 book Ancient Greek Athletics (p. ... the athlete dedicated himself by the use of oil [which was used, for example, ...

Homer and Ancient Greek Life Internet Hunt by Cindy O'Hora

www.mrsoshouse.com/ext/greeklife.html

Use your online skills to find the answer. 7. What is the Parthenon? Where would you go to see it in person? 8. What is a strigil? Why did Greek athletes use it? 9.

Ancient Olympics in Olympia Greece

www.olympia-greece.org/contests.html

Ancient Olympics in Olympia Greece. ... These fines were used to pay for bronze statues of. Zeus, and the cheating athlete's name was put on a placard. ... be reminded of the disgrace that would follow if they did not follow the rules and honour the ... would scrape off the sweat, oil and sand with a curved tool called a strigil.

A STRIGIL FROM ROMAN JORDAN: EVIDENCE FOR PERSONAL ...

maajournal.com/Issues/2015/Vol15-2/Full6.pdf

of Greek, Etruscan and Roman athletes. (Fig. 1). ... an athlete, who used strigils in gymnastic activities and for bodily ... nificance of strigils did not spread to cen-.

Strigil | Define Strigil at Dictionary.com

www.dictionary.com/browse/strigil

Strigil definition, an instrument with a curved blade, used especially by the ancient Greeks and Romans for scraping the skin at the bath and in the gymnasium. ... In one the athlete is represented handing his strigil to his slave, in the other the ...

Strigil | Museum of Art and Archaeology

maa.missouri.edu/30-objects/6

Strigil Roman, Eastern Mediterranean(?), ca. 1st-4th century CE Bronze ... The Greeks, Etruscans and Romans used these objects to help cleanse themselves, often after strenuous athletic activity in the gymnasium. ... They soaked in pools of various temperatures; received massages; ate food; read, visited or did business.

ANCIENT OLYMPIC ATHLETES | Facts and Details

factsanddetails.com/world/cat56/sub367/item2007.html

"Not only did Kroton have the best athletes, it had the most beautiful ... It was used mostly by athletes to scrape dirt and oils off their ... Strigils first appeared in Greek art in the 6th century B.C. ...

Ancient Greek and Roman Bathing | Ancient World Alive

www.ancientworldalive.com/single-post/2015/10/27/Ancient-Greek-and-Roman-Bathing

Oct 27, 2015 ... According to the Homeric Epos, Greek used cold water first and then hot; in contrast with the Romans who usually did the other way around - first hot and later cold water. Ancient sources indicated ... Greek athletes in the public baths. .... Strigil - a Roman bathing implement for removing the body dirt. Roman ...

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Strigil (Getty Museum) - The Getty

www.getty.edu

In ancient Greece and Rome, athletes prepared for competition by covering their bodies with oil. After competing or exercising on a dirt field or arena, the athlete ...

What is a Strigil? (with pictures) - wiseGEEK

www.wisegeek.com

A strigil was used to remove olive oil from the skin of athletes in Ancient Greece. ... The Greeks and Romans did not use soap, so the strigil was an important tool ...

Ancient Olympic FAQ 6

www.perseus.tufts.edu

Where did the Olympic games come from? ... How were the athletes trained? ... Athletics were a key part of education in ancient Greece. ... Young men worked with athletic trainers who used long sticks to point out incorrect ... Tondo: strigil