Q:

What is the average family size in Japan?

A:

As of 2010, the average Japanese household contains approximately 2.55 people, with 59 percent of these households consisting of nuclear families (parents with children) and 28 percent consisting of single adults living independently. The average Japanese family has only one child.

The CIA Fact Book states that 1.4 children are born per woman in Japan. This results in a slightly negative population growth overall. Household size has continuously declined since 1980, when the average Japanese household contained 3.22 people. Japan is ranked 11th in terms of population as of 2014, and 91.3 percent of the population is considered to be urban according to 2011 statistics.

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