Q:

What are the basic components of emotional intelligence?

A:

There are five basic components of emotional intelligence: self-awareness, self-regulation, internal motivation, empathy and social skills. The concept of emotional intelligence was developed by a scientific journalist by the name of Daniel Goleman.

Self-awareness is the ability to realistically recognize and understand one's own emotions, moods and motivation and how each facet affects other people. Self-regulation is the ability to control one's own impulses when around others. Internal motivation is the ability to identify one's own interests and learn from one's own mistakes. Empathy is the ability to truly understand and share another person's feelings and emotional make-up. Social skills are possessed when one is capable of building and maintaining social relationships.


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