Q:

What are some Buddhist birth rituals?

A:

Unlike other religions, Buddhism does not use ceremonies or rituals to mark births or other special events and occasions. There may be rituals observed by Buddhist parents at birth that are specific to the country.

In Buddhism, events such as births, marriages and deaths are regarded as secular rather than religious events and so no specific ceremonies have been developed for them. Some ceremonies, however, are specific to particular countries and the spread of Buddhism to the West has resulted in the practice of some rituals.

In Sri Lanka, Theravedic Buddhists will choose a full moon or favorable day to take a newborn child to the nearest temple,. The baby is then placed on the floor in order to receive blessings.

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