Q:

What is the difference between a team and a group?

A:

Quick Answer

A team is commonly defined as a group of people working towards a common team goal. A group is defined as several individuals who may coordinate their efforts towards something, but are not necessarily working towards a specific goal. A team is technically a group, but a group is not necessarily a team.

Know More
What is the difference between a team and a group?
Credit: Flying Colours Ltd Digital Vision Getty Images

Full Answer

A team is understood to be a group wherein thought goes into its formation. The team is often formulated based on its goals and formed around its goals. A good example of this is an accident investigation team. This is a team formed with a common goal, which is to investigate a crime. However, each member of the team is selected to investigate specific elements of the crime and then bring those elements together to find the cause of the accident.

In a non-business environment, a group is simply a group of people gathered to do something on an individual basis and they may or may not be together, such as fans watching a sporting event. On the other hand, a team is a group of people who are collectively working towards something, such as a sports team working to win a game by combining their talents.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the difference between rational and irrational decisions?

    A:

    Rational decisions are generally made by people who are able to determine the possibilities of an outcome, while irrational decisions are based almost entirely on emotion rather than experience. People who have the ability to make rational decisions may be able to do so because they can push past emotional response triggers.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the difference between inductive and deductive logic?

    A:

    Deduction logic uses a hypothesis and examines the possibilities in order to reach a logical conclusion and inductive reasoning makes wide sweeping generalizations from a set of specific observations. The scientific method requires deductive logic to test a hypothesis and scientists also use inductive reasoning to form hypotheses.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the difference between concurring and dissenting opinion?

    A:

    According to About.com. concurring opinions are written by associate court justices who agree with the majority opinion on a given case, but for somewhat different reasons than the rest of the majority. Dissenting opinions are written by justices who are not in the majority and wish to publicly disagree with the ruling of the court. In many instances, concurring opinions are actually dissenting opinions in disguise.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the difference between declarative knowledge and procedural knowledge?

    A:

    The difference between declarative and procedural knowledge is that the former refers to unchanging, factual information and the latter refers to the collective thought processes that define how things are done, according to Education.com. Known facts such as names assigned to numbers and plants are examples of declarative knowledge. The learned set of complex tasks used to drive a car is an example of procedural knowledge.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore