Q:

What are disadvantages of child labor?

A:

The disadvantages of child labor include: susceptibility to abuse, low pay rates, hazardous working conditions and illegal work, such as drug trafficking, child prostitution and human trafficking. Additionally, the educational development of child laborers is often stunted by the limited access to school time and other educational opportunities. According to the ILO conference report of 1996, child labor is the single most important source of child abuse and exploitation.

Child labor is the employment of minors in any labor industry, particularly when it is illegal or exploitative. The ILO defines hazardous child labor as work that by its nature or the circumstances in which it is carried out is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children. A couple examples include slavery, the use of child soldiers, prostitution and drug trafficking. The effects of these forms of child labor are traumatic, and they include long-term health and psychological problems for the children involved.

The ILO conducted a research in 26 countries, where they discovered that one-quarter of all child laborers suffer injuries or illnesses on the job. In the United States, businesses that employ a large number of child workers tend to generate more occupational injuries than industry average. One of the plausible reasons is that child laborers often work in unskilled types of jobs, which are dangerous and high risk. Since many child laborers come from poor family backgrounds, poverty-related problems, such as general poor health, often aggravate the risks, leading to exponential injury rates among child workers.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How is the labor force participation rate calculated?

    A:

    The labor force participation rate is calculated by adding the number of the noninstitutionalized and nonactive military duty population between the ages of 16 and 64 who are employed or who are looking for work. The United States Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) bases the labor force participation rate on Census Bureau population projections.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you define free labor ideology?

    A:

    The definition of free labor ideology is the belief that labor should result in independence and wealth distribution. Free labor ideology is a term used to refer to the differences between the Northern and Southern economies during the nineteenth century. A common misconception is that free labor ideology refers to the economy of the South at that time. However, the term refers to the economic opportunities in the North during that period.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the causes of labor unrest?

    A:

    Although many conditions can lead to labor unrest, the most common are poor and dangerous working conditions, unfair pay for the labor provided and income inequality among workers. American labor unrest in the late-19th and early-20th century came from a shift in socioeconomic status among laborers.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the formula used to calculate labor productivity?

    A:

    Labor productivity is determined by dividing the output, or total amount of goods or services produced, by the number of workers. Labor productivity is used to measure worker efficiency.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore