Q:

What is an example of a human act?

A:

A classic example of a human act is Eve's decision to eat the apple in the Garden of Eden. A human act is an act of free will committed by a human. Human acts are primarily a religious concept based on the idea that God gave humans free will so that they can make their own decisions based on morals and the knowledge of what may happen as a result. A human act is directly related to the ideas of right and wrong.

In Judeo-Christian religions, choosing right from wrong ultimately decides a man's fate. He may either choose right and spend eternity with God in Heaven or choose wrong and spend eternity in Hell with Satan. Free will allows everyone to choose either path. Established morality, along with knowledge, provides man with tools of measure in making decisions about how to act.

The intellect also plays a role in approving human acts. The intellect guides a person to do acts that are either considered morally good or morally bad. Things that are morally good are associated closer to religion, while things that are morally bad are not. Standards that determine what is good or bad vary based on culture and upbringing.


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