Q:

What are some examples of divergent thinking?

A:

Quick Answer

Brainstorming, free writing, keeping a journal and mind-mapping are examples of divergent thinking. The goal of divergent thinking is to focus on a subject, in a free-wheeling way, to think of solutions that may not be obvious or predetermined. All ideas are valid for idea stimulation in divergent thinking.

Know More

Full Answer

Divergent thinking is the opposite of convergent thinking, which involves solving problems through obvious choices only. One would use convergent thinking to answer multiple choice tests on an exam, but use divergent thinking methods to answer an essay. Convergent thinking is considered black and white, while divergent thinking has gray areas.

Learn more about Logic & Reasoning

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a dialectical journal?

    A:

    The purpose of a dialectical journal is for the reader to write down interesting, memorable or important passages in a text as he reads literature. By writing about literature, the reader is able to make personal connections and interpretations.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are perceptual blocks that influence views when it comes to critical thinking?

    A:

    The perceptual blocks that influence views when it comes to critical thinking can be seen as obstacles that prevent a person from clearly perceiving the information required to solve a problem, according to The Electric Web Matrix of Digital Technology. Blocks in critical thinking are known to impede people from reaching a reasonable basis relating to beliefs.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some examples of syllogism?

    A:

    One classic example of a syllogism is "All men are mortal. Socrates is a man. Socrates is mortal." A syllogism is a logical argument that forms a set of three conclusions with the first two conclusions justifying the third.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some examples of sensationalism in journalism and media?

    A:

    Some of the more well-known examples of the use of sensationalism in journalism and media have been the newspaper coverage of the events leading to the Spanish-American War, the reporting on the life and death of Princess Diana and the attention given to the Casey Anthony trial. The reliance upon sensationalism in newspaper reporting began in the late 19th century as publishers William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer battled to corner the greater share of the market for their respective publications. Sensationalism then entered the realms of radio, television, the Internet and social media as the newer forms of communication appeared and evolved.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore