Q:

What does "false cause and effect" mean in logic?

A:

In logic, "false cause and effect" is when one event is said to have caused another event just because the first event preceded the second event. It is a logical fallacy because it uses sequence as the only evidence without considering other factors.

The original Latin term for "false cause and effect" is "post hoc ergo propter hoc," which translates to "after this, therefore because of this." The Latin name can be shortened to "post hoc." It is often used in advertising, where a positive change is attributed to the product being sold without mentioning other factors that could have been just as beneficial.


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