Q:

What was the first human race on Earth?

A:

Quick Answer

According to an article published in The Independent, the San people are most likely the oldest human population group to inhabit Earth. The claim is based on an extensive analysis of African DNA in a study published in the journal Science.

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What was the first human race on Earth?
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Full Answer

The San people live in southern Africa and are also known as bushmen. The San have been hunter-gatherers for thousands of years. According to the scientists who published the study, the San are direct descendants of the first population of early human ancestors. These are the ancestors of all Africans and, by extension, all modern humans, as it is believed that early human migration from Africa is what populated the other continents.

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