Q:

What is a Jewish matchmaker called?

A:

Quick Answer

A Jewish matchmaker is called a shadchan if he is a male or a shadchanit if she is female. The tradition of matchmaking is known as shidduch. Professional matchmakers are paid to propose potential matches between singles, a tradition that has continued within the Orthodox Jewish community.

Know More

Full Answer

There is a mistaken belief that the word for a Jewish matchmaker is "yenta" or "yente." The origin of this error is the 1964 musical "Fiddler on the Roof," in which a character named Yente serves as the matchmaker for the village of Anatevka. The Yiddish name "Yente" derives from a word meaning "gentle" or "noble," but it has come to refer to a woman who is a gossip or a busybody, much like the character in the musical.

Learn more about Judaism

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a Jewish beard?

    A:

    A Jewish beard has deep roots in Jewish culture, according to the Torah and in the Kabbalah. The Torah forbids the use of a razor. Trimming or shaving with other tools is allowed as long as the beard is not shaved smooth.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do Jewish people pray?

    A:

    Jewish people pray three times a day in a standing position. Kneeling during prayer is performed during Yom Kippur.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are Jewish people not allowed to eat?

    A:

    Some foods that Jews are forbidden to eat include pig products, such as pork, bacon and ham, seafood that has neither fins nor scales, such as lobster, crab or scallops, and anything that flies in swarms, such as insects. The Jewish dietary laws are called kashrut.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you explain that Hanukkah is not the Jewish Christmas?

    A:

    To explain that Hanukkah is not the Jewish Christmas, begin by stating that the two are completely different holidays, celebrating different events, and are observed by followers of different religious faiths, notes Bible Study Planet. Some people use the analogy that Hanukkah is the Jewish Christmas to explain the holiday to non-Jews, but the two holidays are markedly different.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore