Are Jewish people buried standing up?
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Q:

Are Jewish people buried standing up?

A:

Quick Answer

The myth that Jewish people are buried standing up is untrue, although there are a number of traditions specific to Jewish funerals. The most important of these is that burial should occur within 24 hours of death.

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Full Answer

The traditional Jewish funeral ceremony, called a "levayah," begins with the family of the deceased asking for forgiveness and ends with the attendees shoveling soil over the casket while specific prayers are said. Since Jewish law prohibits displaying the body, cremation and embalming, traditional funerals involve burying the deceased in a casket horizontally. Also, while funeral flowers are not strictly forbidden, it is customary to not send them.

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